Lingcod

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Matt
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Lingcod

Post by Matt » Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:23 pm

Lingcod (Pphiodon elongatus) are a member of the Pacific Greenling family and are not in fact a true cod species despite their given name and many nicknames with "cod" in them. Females are larger than males and may reach sizes upwards of 50 lbs. Females mature at 3-5 yrs and may live to 20 yrs, reaching a maximum size of 120 cm. Males mature at 2 yrs, may live up to 14 yrs, and reach a maximum size of about 90 cm. Presently, the season for lings in Puget Sound is short and the slot limit is small between only 26-36". Generous limits and size restrictions are still available in the Pacific Ocean. Lingcod are identifiable by their elongated body structure, and long dorsal fin which extends the length of their body. Their skin is yellowish brown and mottled with brown spots throughout the length of the body. The head is extremely large and the mouth is full of rows of razor sharp teeth. Lingcod are ambush predators and feed primarily on other fish species using rocky structure and sunken obstructions for cover. Spawning occurs from December through March, but peaks from mid-January to mid-February during which time the larger females are abundant throughout Puget Sound and viable lingcod spawning habitat. Puget sound seasons have been set by the state to protect the larger spawning females during these vulnerable times.

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Last edited by Matt on Fri May 13, 2011 5:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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rojomojo
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Re: Lingcod

Post by rojomojo » Sun Jan 04, 2015 10:49 pm

I was at NB and saw a guy cleaning one that was almost pure blue from its belly to it's meat inside. How is that? Diet would be my guess but scientific explanation would be awesome.

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fishnislife
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Re: Lingcod

Post by fishnislife » Mon Jan 05, 2015 5:33 am

Honestly, I would think there diet too. Maybe they consume more squid than others and the ink while digesting gets into their meat.
Never was lucky enough to catch one myself, but I have seen them and they are a trip. Kind of like catching something albino.
You know maybe it's just a genetic anomaly like an albino fish or animal. Makes me wonder how common they are.



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jd39
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Re: Lingcod

Post by jd39 » Mon Jan 05, 2015 6:00 am

Very tasty fish! God I want a salt boat! Have seen that blue/green tint on greenlings and cabazon too.

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Mike Carey
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Re: Lingcod

Post by Mike Carey » Tue Jan 06, 2015 6:47 am

pretty sure it's the diet. I caught a cabezon years ago at Neah Bay that had the same coloring. Beautiful colors.
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Polyangler
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Re: Lingcod

Post by Polyangler » Sun Jan 18, 2015 6:09 pm

Ling, cabs, and the occasional greenling will take on that blue color. Same as some chinook will have white flesh. It has nothing to do with their diet. It's the way that individual processes the food it eats. The blue is actually a bile in the blood. Some people claim that blue bottom fish, and white king taste better than others. I personally don't notice a difference, but it always makes me laugh when my dinner guest think I'm cooking some weird muppet fish. I wish it kept the blue hue when cooked, but they turn just as white as the standard models.

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leefromseattle
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Re: Lingcod

Post by leefromseattle » Fri Feb 20, 2015 11:30 pm

They're one of the tastiest and dumbest fish there are.

You don't even have to get a hook in them and unless you pull their head out of the water or jerk it away from them, they won't let go. They just clamp down on the bait fish and ride all the way into the net.

You can catch lings just about anywhere from shore that there are rocks. I used to go to deception pass under the bridge before I got a kayak.

A little bladed spinner (for trout) along kelp paddies or along rocks with lots of seaweed will catch greenlings or similar for bait. (from shore too, no excuses...)

hawkoath
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Re: Lingcod

Post by hawkoath » Sat Feb 21, 2015 6:04 pm

If you are looking for a fish that would turn blue when cooked you can use the old Treut au la Bleu formula of keeping a trout alive and then bonking it and gutting it. Throw it in some white vinegar immediately and the skin will turn blue and stay that way.

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Re: Lingcod

Post by mlgetbent » Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:31 am

I thought I would share one of my favorite ling pics from a couple years back... Lil turd still brags that its the biggest landed on my boat...Had to remind him of the 25 pounder I caught on my buddies [thumbsup] [
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